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Vol12 No.23
ISSN 2317-9694

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SUMMARIES AND OTHER CREATIVE MYSTERIES IN ART, IDEAS AND COMPUTER MUSIC SCIENCE

Approaching technology applied to music and art in general, leads to the birth and development of new areas of knowledge that must necessarily permeate educational courses from basic level to specialization programs.


As inventors, composers, researchers and musicians, we have built a significant number of systems and products that resonate today in the life of each person. These range from the most advanced forms of contemporary music composition, sound synthesis, performance, real-time composition and sound processing; to everyday consumer-oriented activities such as mass market music production and play-back systems.


Many of the early developments in computer music (as you will read in some of the articles), are still expressed today in one form or another within more evolved computer systems and environments.


Computer science today, offers us much more accessible artificial intelligence algorithms with a great diversity of applications never imagined. Opening amazing opportunities to develop (among others), new algorithmic composition techniques, thus expanding the work that Hiller, Koenig and Xenakis did at the beginning.


The use of computers in music and art is possibly the most exciting and liberating thing in the history of music. It is certainly an appeal to those creative people who wish to explore the possibilities (and limits) of music and be as musically creative as possible.


For me, it is an immense pleasure to share with you this selection of contributing authors. A compilation that reflects in a surgical way our avatar as creators, users and inventors of technology applied to music ranging from the 80s up to present date and how new paradigms appear and manifest themselves in the creation and interpretation of music with technology.


In Summaries and Other Creative Mysteries in Art, Ideas and Computer Music Science, we find topics that include: The design of digital instruments, New interfaces for capturing gestures, Artificial Intelligence, Algorithmic composition, Generative processes, Collaborative relations with other disciplines, The human voice as an object that generates ideas and digital instruments and reflections on creation using advance computer environments.


I therefore divide the journal into four themes that converge with the articles proposed for this issue of Ideas Sonicas, and these are:


IMAGINARY, IDEAS AND CREATION I
Lippe, Rai, Simoni.


ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, SYNTHETIC ABSTRACTIONS, GESTURE CAPTURING
Rowe, Collins, Olofsson, Tanaka.

 

IMAGINARY, IDEAS AND CREATION II
Puckette, Manoury, Lewis.


THE VOICE AS A CENTRE OF CREATION AND GENERATION OF NEW INSTRUMENTS
Formant Brothers, Wishart.


My purpose for this edition is to spread enthusiasm for "the science of computer music" and the cybernetic imagination that we all carry within us more efficiently than COVID-19.


Finally, I would like to thank Rodrigo Sigal for his generous invitation to curate this issue of Ideas Sonica.


DR. ROBERTO MORALES MANZANARES

 

Editor's notes

SUMMARIES AND OTHER CREATIVE MYSTERIES IN ART, IDEAS AND COMPUTER MUSIC SCIENCE

Approaching technology applied to music and art in general, leads to the birth and development of new areas of knowledge that must necessarily permeate educational courses from basic level to specialization programs.


As inventors, composers, researchers and musicians, we have built a significant number of systems and products that resonate today in the life of each person. These range from the most advanced forms of contemporary music composition, sound synthesis, performance, real-time composition and sound processing; to everyday consumer-oriented activities such as mass market music production and play-back systems.


Many of the early developments in computer music (as you will read in some of the articles), are still expressed today in one form or another within more evolved computer systems and environments.


Computer science today, offers us much more accessible artificial intelligence algorithms with a great diversity of applications never imagined. Opening amazing opportunities to develop (among others), new algorithmic composition techniques, thus expanding the work that Hiller, Koenig and Xenakis did at the beginning.


The use of computers in music and art is possibly the most exciting and liberating thing in the history of music. It is certainly an appeal to those creative people who wish to explore the possibilities (and limits) of music and be as musically creative as possible.


For me, it is an immense pleasure to share with you this selection of contributing authors. A compilation that reflects in a surgical way our avatar as creators, users and inventors of technology applied to music ranging from the 80s up to present date and how new paradigms appear and manifest themselves in the creation and interpretation of music with technology.


In Summaries and Other Creative Mysteries in Art, Ideas and Computer Music Science, we find topics that include: The design of digital instruments, New interfaces for capturing gestures, Artificial Intelligence, Algorithmic composition, Generative processes, Collaborative relations with other disciplines, The human voice as an object that generates ideas and digital instruments and reflections on creation using advance computer environments.


I therefore divide the journal into four themes that converge with the articles proposed for this issue of Ideas Sonicas, and these are:


IMAGINARY, IDEAS AND CREATION I
Lippe, Rai, Simoni.


ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, SYNTHETIC ABSTRACTIONS, GESTURE CAPTURING
Rowe, Collins, Olofsson, Tanaka.

 

IMAGINARY, IDEAS AND CREATION II
Puckette, Manoury, Lewis.


THE VOICE AS A CENTRE OF CREATION AND GENERATION OF NEW INSTRUMENTS
Formant Brothers, Wishart.


My purpose for this edition is to spread enthusiasm for "the science of computer music" and the cybernetic imagination that we all carry within us more efficiently than COVID-19.


Finally, I would like to thank Rodrigo Sigal for his generous invitation to curate this issue of Ideas Sonicas.


DR. ROBERTO MORALES MANZANARES